Anthony Goldbloom: The jobs we’ll lose to machines

The future state of any single job lies in the answer to a single question: To what extent is that job reducible to frequent, high-volume tasks, and to what extent does it involve tackling novel situations? On frequent, high-volume tasks, machines are getting smarter and smarter. Today they grade essays. They diagnose certain diseases. Over coming years, they’re going to conduct our audits, and they’re going to read boilerplate from legal contracts. Accountants and lawyers are still needed. They’re going to be needed for complex tax structuring, for pathbreaking litigation. But machines will shrink their ranks and make these jobs harder to come by.
Anthony Goldbloom

Ira Glass on the Creative Process

Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesn’t have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone I’ve ever met. It’s gonna take awhile. It’s normal to take awhile. You’ve just gotta fight your way through.Ira Glass

Automating R scripts under Windows

Setting up an automated job under Linux is a cinch thanks to cron. Doing the same under Windows is a little more tricky, but still eminently doable.

I found this tutorial helpful:

That got me 99% of the way there. I wrote a batch file to trigger the script. The critical element was changing to the correct location before invoking R.

@echo off
cd "C:\Users\AndrewCo\Projects\"
R CMD BATCH script.R